Getting High for the First Time: 13 Things You Should Know

Are you considering using medicinal cannabis and you’re not sure of the best conditions under which to self-medicate? Are you just curious and want to find out for yourself what effects cannabis may have on you? Did you already try it and you’re wondering what happened? We’re here for you!

Are you thinking of ‘getting high’ or ‘getting stoned’ for the first time, in order to experience the altered state of perception this brings? Are you suffering from a condition or ailment that has been shown to be alleviated or helped by using medicinal cannabis, but you have never used it before and you’re not sure of the best conditions under which to self-medicate for the first time?

Recreational use of cannabis is just as important to properly prepare yourself for. Are you curious as to what all the fuss is about? Do you want to find out for yourself what effects cannabis will have on you? Equip yourself properly for trying cannabis for the first time with our top thirteen things you should know before your first cannabis experience!

1. Is this a good time for your first cannabis experience?

Are you feeling generally positive about yourself? Are you rested, fed, and in pleasant and trusted company? Do you have some good quality cannabis that you’re confident is a strain you want to try? Then yes, this is probably a good time.

Do you have something to do later? Are you feeling stressed, sad or anxious? Are you drunk, or otherwise intoxicated? Are the people around you argumentative or unpleasant? Is a relative due to phone you? Then no, you should probably reschedule.

2. Is this a good place to try cannabis for the first time?

Set and setting are vitally important. Are you at home, or somewhere else that feels secure and comfortable? Is there somewhere you can lie down for a bit if you feel like it? Is there something to eat and drink? Can you choose the music and the lighting? Are you with people you trust? If the answer to all these questions is “Yes!”, this sounds like a great place to try cannabis for the first time.

Are you in a strange place with people you don’t know? Do you have to maintain the impression that you are not in an altered state for any reason? Is there a good chance that you will have to leave before you’re ready to? Are you going to have to negotiate unfamiliar stairs? Is there a lack of fruit or other snacks? If the answer to these questions is “Yes,”, you should probably rethink your plans.

3. You might not feel anything

Unlike many other drugs, which make their effects felt quite drastically, cannabis can creep up on you gently. The effects of small doses can be subtle. If you’re being smart and taking it easy for your first time trying cannabis, you might not notice anything!

Renowned cannabis expert Lester Grinspoon wrote his ground-breaking book “Marijuana Reconsidered” before ever trying cannabis himself. The first time he did, he didn’t really notice any effects. However, he continued trying. At the point when he was standing in a friend’s kitchen, talking, laughing and devouring a pizza which was better than any pizza he’d ever eaten, he suddenly realized he was high for the first time. So, if you want to ‘do cannabis like an expert’, be prepared to be like Dr Grinspoon and invest time in several attempts to enjoy all that the plant has to offer.

4. Don’t mix your drugs

Although cannabis is safer than almost every other recreational drug, deciding to try it for the first time when you’re already in an altered state is a bad idea. Alcohol is the most common and possibly worst culprit. If you’re not used to the effects of cannabis, the effects of alcohol will blur your perception of how it is affecting you. You are more likely to become disoriented and throw up than to enjoy a new and pleasant experience. Prescribed drugs can also interact with cannabis (see point 10).

5. Your perception may alter in ways you are not expecting

Our perceptions of time, colour, sound, taste, pattern recognition and spatial awareness are all altered by cannabis. Depending on the strength and amount of cannabis you consume, you may experience this to a greater or lesser extent. You may also notice these effects more distinctly depending on what you’re doing. If you’re not sure whether you’re feeling anything, try listening to a favourite piece of music, looking at art, playing a game, having a snack, or even just putting a cover on a double duvet.

You may also experience the oft-mocked short-term memory loss that THC can cause, although this is really just the same as walking from one room to another and then wondering what you went in there for, or losing your train of thought because something distracts you.

6. Your perception may not alter in ways you are expecting

Thanks to almost a century of misinformation about cannabis, you might be expecting far more pronounced alterations of your consciousness than can be achieved with cannabis alone. The effects of cannabis are portrayed to be as dramatic as those of LSD, especially by the media. But this isn’t true.

On an appropriate dose of cannabis alone, you will not believe that you can fly. You will not experience vivid hallucinations of things that are not there. You will not be seized with a sudden desire to run naked down the street. Equally, you will not fail to see things that are there, such as your friends and surroundings. In fact, you may find you notice things about them that you’ve never consciously seen before.

7. How do I know when I’ve had too much cannabis?

For your preliminary experiments with cannabis, the best advice is: as soon as you suspect you are experiencing the effects of cannabis for the first time, stop consuming straight away! Wait for 15 to 20 minutes to see how the feelings develop, and if you like what you are experiencing. Wait until the feelings start to recede before consuming more cannabis.

If you are enjoying yourself and assume that immediately consuming more will equal more enjoyment, you can easily make yourself ill – just as with consuming alcohol.

Unfortunately, you can go from really enjoying your cannabis experience to really not having a good time very quickly. This is why we recommend gradually increasing your dose to begin with. Start slowly. You can always get higher. Getting less high is trickier.

What does a cannabis overdose feel like?   

You may start to feel dizzy and nauseous, and experience a vertigo-like sensation. Feeling cold, sweating, and shaking are common. Blood drains from the face, leaving you extremely pale. This is why the unpleasant effects of too much cannabis are known as ‘having a whitey’ or ‘whiting out’.

Sometimes, a form of tunnel vision, or sound seeming to distort into white noise, or both, can occur. If this happens then vomiting is usually the next step. Don’t panic. Although it is possible to overdose on cannabis, it is impossible to die from a cannabis overdose.

8. Never try cannabis on an empty stomach: cannabis, hypoglycemia and orthostatic hypotension

Many inexperienced cannabis users undergo a sudden and disabling drop in blood pressure that may lead to physical collapse and unconsciousness (orthostatic or postural hypotension) if not immediately addressed. For this reason, it is important to never consume cannabis on an empty stomach. The increase in heart rate that usually results causes blood to circulate more rapidly, diluting the insulin in the bloodstream and impacting the body’s ability to metabolise glucose.

The 15:15 rule holds that 15 grams of sugar followed by a wait of 15 minutes will return low blood sugar to normal levels

If your stomach is empty, the lack of sugar available for the existing insulin to break down causes hypoglycemia (a sudden drop in blood sugar). It is believed that there is a link between hypoglycemia and orthostatic hypotension, as many sufferers of recurrent orthostatic hypotension are found to have low blood sugar.

If you experience such symptoms after consuming cannabis, do not panic. Sitting in a comfortable position while sipping sugar water will usually return blood sugar to normal levels within a short time. The 15:15 rule holds that consuming 15 grams of sugar and waiting for 15minutes effectively returns the blood glucose to normal levels.

Individuals that continue to use cannabis usually find that as dose tolerance increases with time, frequency and intensity of such events decreases rapidly. However, if symptoms persist, medical attention may be advisable as recurrence may point to an underlying condition.

9. Nobody is talking about you and you’re not going to die, you just need to eat a banana

The two side effects of cannabis that are probably best known and most feared are paranoia and ‘having a whitey’ (see above). Paranoia can stem from the heightened perception of your surroundings and the people around you. This is especially applicable if you’re in a place where cannabis is illegal and being in an altered state is not usually acceptable (unless it’s caused by alcohol). These factors alone can be enough to cause feelings of discomfort and the impression that everyone is looking at you or talking about you.

If you’ve picked a good setting for your experience (see “2. Is this a good place to try cannabis for the first time?” above) then things which may cause paranoia or distress should be minimized. Firmly telling yourself “Everybody is far too busy wondering what everyone else is thinking about them to think about me” can be surprisingly effective.

Feelings of paranoia often indicate the onset of a whitey. When the effects of cannabis are unfamiliar, they can easily lead to anxiety. A high degree of anxiety can exacerbate paranoia and lead to a whitey. The best way to deal with this is to have some sugar and carbohydrates. The humble banana is ideal for sorting you out if you start to feel wobbly. Lying down and staying warm is also very helpful.

Many seasoned cannabis consumers (this writer included) will still occasionally misjudge dosage, setting, or blood sugar levels, and experience the same sensations of nausea, faintness and tunnel vision as a novice. The major difference is that the novice may panic and wonder where it will end, whereas the expert will lie down and ask for a snack.

10. Consider any medical or psychological conditions that you have

Are you diabetic? Is there a history of mental illness in your family? Are you suffering from depression? Are you already on any medication? Do you have any problems with your lungs? Since cannabis is a legitimate medicine as well as a recreational substance, its interaction with other medications and conditions should not be underestimated. Consult your physician if you know or suspect that there is any factor that could preclude your safe and healthy use of cannabis.

Certain pre-existing health conditions are known to be affected by cannabis in various ways. These include epilepsy, hypertension, migraine, schizophrenia, and many more. The medical community is rapidly acquiring new information about how these effects occur. However, consensus has still not been reached in many cases.

For example, it has been suggested that THC in low doses is a highly effective treatment for depression, whereas in high doses the benefit can be negated and depression can in fact be exacerbated. A dose-dependent effect has been proposed for various other illnesses including schizophreniaarthritis (and other inflammatory diseases), and hypertension—not just in response to THC but also to cannabidiol (CBD), another cannabinoid of huge medical significance.

There is much evidence to suggest that dosage and cannabinoid ratio are of the utmost importance when it comes to medical cannabis use, and that the chosen method of consumption may also make a difference to benefits. This is another reason to seek professional medical advice whenever necessary.

Cannabis and mental health

The underlying cause of most mental illnesses has not been established beyond doubt. Nevertheless, in 2001, the World Health Organization estimated that up to 25% of people experience some form of mental illness within their lifetime.

The link between substance dependence and many of these often very serious conditions has been noted on various occasions. There is very little evidence to suggest that use of cannabis itself is a cause of mental illness, but the extremely high incidence of heavy cannabis use among mentally ill people requires careful analysis.

While several studies have concluded that sufferers of mental illness are not self-medicating by using cannabis, many report some subjective relief from symptoms through their cannabis use. This includes people suffering from schizophrenia, from anxiety, and from bipolar disorder. The implication—persistent in much of the literature—that such individuals are merely seeking to “get high” is insulting and untrue.

Even if smoked cannabis is not the ideal medication for the particular symptoms, it may lead to greater subjective improvement than many currently-available medications such as lithium or chlorpromazine, with their serious side-effects and potentially fatal risk of overdose.

However, if suffering from a chronic psychiatric condition (such as schizophrenia, clinical depression or bipolar disorder), it is highly advisable to moderate your intake of cannabis to low doses, and to inform your physician of your cannabis use.

11. Research and decide upon the best method for you to use cannabis for the first time

Smoking cannabis, although still the most common way of consuming it, is actually one of the least healthy methods. Its advantage for first time cannabis users is that the dose is easy to control, and can be increased in increments until the desired effect is reached.

Controversy remains over the inherent harm of smoking cannabis. Several studies have concluded that smoking cannabis may be a risk factor for lung cancer, just like tobacco is. However, many of these studies have investigated individuals who smoke both cannabis and tobacco, and have failed to adequately control for the effects of tobacco.

Other studies have indicated that smoking high-quality cannabis carries no added risk of cancer or lung disease, and that smoking may in fact be a highly effective method for certain conditions due to its immediate effects.

Asthma may be one such condition. However, to minimise any possible risk of causing lung irritation by combustion of tars and other compounds that may be present in plant matter, using a vaporiser is a safer and effective alternative. Other than vaporising, those seeking alternative methods of consumption can opt for sublingual application (usually in the form of a tincture), “medibles” for oral consumption, and even pharmaceutically isolated cannabinoids such as Marinol.

Eating it obviously won’t irritate your lungs, but judging the dose is far harder, the effects take longer to manifest and also longer to wear off. A common error with edibles is eating too much because you think it’s not working, and then two hours later it all kicks in at once. Vaporizers offer the best way for many people, and are easier to obtain than ever before.

Cannabis contaminated with ground glass

12. Consider the source of the cannabis you are planning to try

For those of you not fortunate to have safe access to cannabis (who are also unable to grow their own), it is of the utmost importance to secure a supply which is reliable and of reasonable quality. The potential harm of contaminants and low-quality cannabis has not been definitively assessed, but numerous potentially harmful ingredients, such as ground glass and building grit, may be added to increase weight. This can cause severe respiratory consequences if used.

Even if black-market cannabis is free from weight-increasing additives, the levels of pesticide and fertiliser used in cultivation may be dangerously high. For these reasons, it is always preferable to grow one’s own cannabis, in order to ensure that chemicals are kept to a minimum. Failing that, establishing a trusted source as close as possible to the origin of production is a close second. Keeping one’s sources to a minimum ensures consistency of quality and minimises legal risk.

13. Provide entertainment for your altered state self

Games, big coffee table books with beautiful photographs, a selection of music, snacks that require assembly (try making your own pizza! Just be careful around the oven), making a collage – all of these things take on a new dimension when you’re high. When you try cannabis for the first time, you may feel like sitting in quiet introspection, in which case you’ll just need a cushion. However, if cannabis takes you in a creative direction, you will appreciate having some activities to hand.

We hope you find these tips useful. Please share your own with us in the comments, and tell us if there is anything you wish you had known before trying cannabis for the first time! And if you’re already an experienced cannabis user and you have friends who are thinking of experimenting with cannabis for the first time, be sure to share this post with them; it could save them (and you) from having to deal with a whitey!

  • Disclaimer:
    This article is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always consult with your doctor or other licensed medical professional. Do not delay seeking medical advice or disregard medical advice due to something you have read on this website.

Comments

23 thoughts on “Getting High for the First Time: 13 Things You Should Know”

  1. ALec.De.Vincenzo

    Hello…Good Day to You in the Netherlands. I am in Search of High Concentrate THC OIL to Cure My Inflamed COLON Disorder,PIRONESE Disease and Continuous Back Pain which Could Possibly be POFFORIA. Could You Possibly Help Me in Advising Me as to Where I can Obtain. this. OIL From…BEST REGARDS. ALec. Cape Town South Africa….

    1. Manuel De Lagavotte - Sensi Seeds

      Hello Alec,

      Unfortunately cannabis extracts are illegal in Europe which makes it legally impossible to find, let alone to get a medical prescription to use it.

      We sincerely hope such situation will soon be history and that any patient in need will be able to access an appropriate medicine for their ailments.

      Best regards,

  2. Hypoglycemia (common usage) is also a term in popular culture and alternative medicine for a common, often self-diagnosed, condition characterized by shakiness and altered mood and thinking, but without measured low glucose or risk of severe harm. It is treated by changing eating patterns.

  3. The ” facts” in this article about hypoglycemia in are naive and outright dangerous. consuming sugar water is the absolute worst thing one can do to counteract hyperglycemia or ” low blood sugar” . The fact is, consuming refined sugar is the cause of hypoglycemia. If you follow this person’s advice, eventually you are quite likely to become diabetic. Our bodies create all the ” sugar” it needs through a healthy diet free of sugars and refined starches. The advice in this article reflects the foolishness of modern society that says ” treat the symptoms without addressing the true cause of the disease. Please consider removing or revising this article with true facts and please consider allowing only qualified individuals to write about matters of health. Unfortunately there is as much if not more misinformation about diabetes and hypoglycemia on the internet than there is viable information. Even many medical professionals will misinform you about diabetes and ” sugar”. Why? 2 reasons: the main reason is money. Insulin is a HUGE money making racket. The more people that end up on it, the more $ they all make. Secondly is the confusion about the word Sugar…. as well as the word glucose. Most doctors don’t want to bother with educating there patients about the difference in the “sugar” that our bodies naturally produce and the sugar that we find in so many of our foods. If hypoglycemia is something you suffer from, please, do yourself a favor and educate yourself and always cross reference what you read on the internet. Unfortunately, at least in America, the mainstream information on this subject has , at best, been dumbed down to the point that it is incorrect or is just outright wrong and will lead many to a life of medical dependence. Learn the difference between “complex” carbohydrates(good) and “simple” carbohydrates(bad). Avoid simple carbs and eat a balanced diet of complex carbs and protein.

    1. Seshata - Sensi Seeds

      The advice given in this article is intended for people experiencing the acute effects of cannabis intoxication. If you are not suffering from the acute effects of cannabis intoxication, we do not recommend regular consumption of highly sugary drinks or foods, as this can have various health complications. However, if suffering from the acute effects of cannabis intoxication, drinking a sugary drink can be a quick-fix solution to restore blood sugar to normal levels. It is also advisable to eat a well-balanced, substantial meal within 30-60 minutes of an episode of acute cannabis intoxication leading to a drop in blood sugar. This will help maintain blood sugar at healthy levels. We do not advise repeatedly consuming quantities of cannabis sufficient to cause an acute reaction such as described herein, and we do not advise regularly seeking to remedy this reaction with sugary drinks. If we were advising use of this quick-fix remedy as a standard cure for an everyday occurrence, you might have a point. Given that we’re not, though, you don’t. Thanks anyway 🙂

      PS – “treat the symptoms without addressing the true cause of the disease”… umm, the underlying cause IS cannabis intoxication. As for your snide comments about only allowing ‘qualified’ people to post on this blog, please outline your relevant qualifications. And while you’re at it, maybe a source or two to back up your claims?

      1. I’m glad Jason brought this up and your detailed response shows the relevance of his point. No need to have a go at him especially since you mostly agree.

    2. @Jason…I was wondering are you a diabetic? If so type 1 or type 2 and yes insulin is a huge money maker, however a type 1 diabetic would die without this medication. Also if your blood sugar is at a dangerously low level and you do not have access to juice or food sugar water will do the trick. If your a type 1 diabetic your blood sugar will NOT stabilize itself without carbs or glucose being eaten or drank or via IV by medical professionals. Just a little education

    3. I totally agree with Jason. I get hypoglycemia sometimes when I smoke and eat fruit and protein to bring my glucose (sugar) levels up. Don’t eat a bunch of candy or sugar, that’s not the right or healthy way to bring your glucose levels up. Consult a physician about a proper diet and the proper foods to eat when experiencing hypoglycemia. This article needs to be rewritten by a doctor or health professional that blows about these health issues. Thank you for reading, have a good day.

      1. Scarlet Palmer - Sensi Seeds

        Hi Nadine,

        Thanks for your comment. Please see the author’s response to Jason’s comment, reproduced here below in case it is not showing up in your browser (if you do not see it, please let us know).

        With best wishes,

        Scarlet

        “The advice given in this article is intended for people experiencing the acute effects of cannabis intoxication. If you are not suffering from the acute effects of cannabis intoxication, we do not recommend regular consumption of highly sugary drinks or foods, as this can have various health complications. However, if suffering from the acute effects of cannabis intoxication, drinking a sugary drink can be a quick-fix solution to restore blood sugar to normal levels. It is also advisable to eat a well-balanced, substantial meal within 30-60 minutes of an episode of acute cannabis intoxication leading to a drop in blood sugar. This will help maintain blood sugar at healthy levels. We do not advise repeatedly consuming quantities of cannabis sufficient to cause an acute reaction such as described herein, and we do not advise regularly seeking to remedy this reaction with sugary drinks. If we were advising use of this quick-fix remedy as a standard cure for an everyday occurrence, you might have a point. Given that we’re not, though, you don’t. Thanks anyway ?

        PS – “treat the symptoms without addressing the true cause of the disease”… umm, the underlying cause IS cannabis intoxication. As for your snide comments about only allowing ‘qualified’ people to post on this blog, please outline your relevant qualifications. And while you’re at it, maybe a source or two to back up your claims?”

    4. I have had two hypoglycaemic drops after ingesting 4 drops of 3gm canabis oil although at the same time I have had an infection in the body. Both events landed me in hospital. I am trying to work out whether my sugar drops are due to canabis or infection. I have been taking these drops for almost a year for severe arthritis pain throughout my body. My last event (2 days ago) left me on the floor for and hour or more with me passing in and out of consciousness until I could push myself on my back to wake my 90 year old mother up to call the ambulance. If you have any suggestions I would be most grateful.

  4. john darling

    Very helpful I am always feeling weird at my friends. House but at my house with my friend’s I feel fine thank you for putting this information on here thank you again.john.d

  5. i have reactive hypoglycemia, which means that my blood sugar level is generally normal but there are certain things that reduce my blood sugar dangerously low. Marujuana is one of those things. Upon discussion about this with my medical doctor, he told me there is not much that can be done about my condition and that I should simply consume sugar when I have a hypoglycemic event. Two other MDs told me the same thing. This supports precisely the authors advice to consume sugar water if you are suffering from acute effects of cannabis intoxication.

    1. I also have reactive hypoglycemia. Spoke to my Dr. about it and got the same answer. There’s nothing I can do other than consume some sugar if having a low blood sugar event.
      I definitely don’t smoke weed on an empty stomach. Even on a full stomach if I smoke a lot or the weed is really potent, like dabs, I can still get low blood sugar which can be really horrible.
      I now am always aware that it can happen and drink a cup of juice if I start to feel the least light headed.

  6. I think everyone is right. I passed out from a half glass of wine and a bowl shared with 2 others. I came to this site because it addressed my question “can marijuana cause low blood sugar?” And, my question was answered. This was the second time it happened, first time, no wine. I played down for a while, drank some water, ate some Easter candy and was fine. Just looking for answers. My recommendation, due to experience is, don’ use on an empty stomach

  7. Skinz Crownhill

    I smoked 3 joints yesterday and they were all different strains and I first lost my sight, then I sweated badly this was due to low blood sugars and felt normal after a packet of sweets, will I have to do this every time I smoke weed now?

    1. Scarlet Palmer - Sensi Seeds

      Hi Skinz,

      Sorry to hear about your experience, although if it’s any consolation, this is quite normal. This article on the age-old sport of ‘throwing a whitey’ will give you some more detailed information. I can’t really answer your question though, sorry! Hopefully this won’t happen every time, though if it does, getting a blood test just to check your general blood sugar and insulin levels is a good idea.

      I hope this information is useful 🙂

      With best wishes,

      Scarlet

  8. I have just began enjoying the experiences delivered from cannibus while me experiences from alcohol stem thirty five years.
    One thing that is certain is that cannibus far exceeds the pleasurable effects of alcohol and the following day leaves me rested, alert, and feeling the new day holds so much.
    With alcohol that is simply not the case. When mixed together the effects are exponentiated and I’m not sure I am traveling down the right road by mixing the two experiences.
    One thing is certain and that is this. Marijuana is an exciting and uplifting experience. I wish I had thirty or so different types to experience. It looks like a trip to Colorado is in order!

  9. Margaret outlaw

    I have low sugar, I take medical marijuana. It seem to make it worse, Which tincture
    is best for me.

    1. Scarlet Palmer - Sensi Seeds

      Hi there,

      Thank you for your comment. We are sorry to hear about your situation. As Sensi Seeds is not a medical agency or practitioner, we cannot give any kind of medical advice other than to consult your registered healthcare professional. This article about the potential benefits of medicinal cannabis might be useful for you to show your healthcare provider if they are not familiar with it.

      You may also find it helpful to contact a support group for medicinal cannabis patients. In the UK there is the United Patients Alliance, and throughout much of the rest of the world there is NORML, who should be able to put you in touch with a group in your area (search United Patients Alliance or NORML followed by your area name).

      These are our pages on medicinal cannabis and medicinal cannabis strains, which you might also find interesting.

      With best wishes,

      Scarlet

  10. Marsha Chevalier

    Thank you for this article. I have just started on a cannabis protocol for cancer that requires me to separate CBD and THC. As a new user, I have started with microdoses and titrating up. The CBD (30:1) is fine, but the THC (1:30)has caused what I recognize now to be a hypoglycemic reaction every time. The small amount of THC in the CBD tincture seems okay (we’ll see as I raise the dose) but the THC reaction is not pleasant. I am a 72 year old 100 pounder and have been vegan, low sugar for 40 years. I have experienced hypoglycemia when fasting too long. Doctors say I have nothing “extra” to fall back on when fasting. You have given me some good ideas here, especially not to take the THC on an empty stomach. My protocol is to take it right before bed and first thing in the morning. I think this is where I am getting into trouble, though a change of strain may help as well. The information in this blog will help a lot as I dialogue with my practitioner. Thank you.

    1. As a practitioner of chinese herbalism and 40 years experience with cannabis I can tell you it mobilizes your circulation and in the process uses up a lot of energy. Your diet is simply not providing enough of it. Without meaning to offend you in any way, quite the opposite, I would suggest you investigate the nutritional deficiencies a vegan diet can cause.

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    Sensi Seeds

    The Sensi Seeds Editorial team has been built throughout our more than 30 years of existence. Our writers and editors include botanists, medical and legal experts as well as renown activists the world over including Lester Grinspoon, Micha Knodt, Robert Connell Clarke, Maurice Veldman, Sebastian Maríncolo, James Burton and Seshata.
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    Sanjai Sinha

    Dr Sanjai Sinha is an academic faculty member at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York. He spends his time seeing patients, teaching residents and medical students, and doing health services research. He enjoys patient education and practicing evidence-based medicine. His strong interest in medical review comes from these passions.
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